365 Days of Grief & Healing

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History

Humble Beginnings


In 1900, the Stamey Brothers (Clarence and T.A. Stamey) began selling funeral merchandise to the communities that their store served. They provided clothing for burial, caskets, and any other funeral merchandise that was needed.

The old store’s motto was: "They took care of you from the cradle to the grave." The store conducted this kind of business until 1912.


First Funeral Director

In 1912, the Stamey Brothers realized that the community needed an embalmer. Mr. Ellis Hoyle (pictured left; 1912-1950) was hired to fill the position. The embalming of the body was conducted in the home of the deceased night or day. Mr. Ellis would also conduct the other body preparations at the home, and he would also bring the casket with him. 

Then in 1924, the Stamey Brothers built the present Stamey Store building; part of the third floor of this new building was set aside as the funeral home. The store carried caskets and other funeral merchandise. Mr. Ellis began preparing and casketing the deceased at the store instead of at the deceased’s home; the body was then returned home for the duration of the services. 

In 1938, Ellis Hoyle’s son, Deward Hoyle (pictured right; 1938-1986), became the second licensed embalmer at Stamey Funeral Home. Following Deward’s arrival, he was trained by his father and taught to run the funeral home for the Stamey Family. Mr. Ellis Hoyle died in 1950, and Deward was soon promoted to the head of the funeral home and its services.


Our First Facility


The next major move for the funeral home came in 1952, when the funeral home moved into the Lackey House. This marked the first time that the funeral home had not offered services from their original store location. In 1954, the funeral home was moved to the Cline House (right); it remained there until a more permanent building could be built. A permanent home for the business was completed in 1964, and this building housed a casket selection room, chapel, embalming room, and offices. 


Deward soon received more help at the funeral home when Mr. Douglas Tysinger was hired in 1968 as a licensed funeral serviceman. Douglas and Deward would work together for nearly 18 years until Deward passed away from cancer in 1986. Following Deward’s death, Douglas took over all operations of the funeral home.


Present Day

The funeral home underwent several major changes in 1987. Mr. Douglas Tysinger and Mr. Norris Wright purchased the funeral home from the Stamey Family. Following the purchase of the funeral home, their aim was to provide the best service and finest merchandise possible. They wanted to provide a place that would care for the people. 

In 1991, Doug Tysinger and Norris Wright built a new wing onto the old building, effectively almost doubling the size of the building. They left the chapel intact, but built two large visitation rooms, which enabled them to accommodate larger services. In December of 1997, the funeral home suffered another loss when Mr. Norris Wright passed away due to a stroke. In 1998 the funeral home ownership was again changed; the Tysinger Family, Douglas and Judy Tysinger, purchased the business in full. There was little time to rest the funeral home had already made plans to expand before Mr. Wright’s death. 

Before Mr. Wright’s death, the funeral home had purchased property in Cherryville and planned to open a funeral home there. In June of 1998 Stamey~Cherryville Funeral Home was opened for business.  Through the opening of the second funeral home, the Tysingers hoped to be able to help more families in need by providing a caring place to help with the loss of their loved one. 

Through the past couple of years, the service of funeral directors has grown. Doug & Judy's son Joseph has joined the funeral home. The funeral home has three funeral service licenses; Cone Carpenter, Pete Craft and Kelly Dellinger. The funeral also has a licensed funeral director, Norris Howell. All of the staff is available at either location.